Haribako-E Catalog


Introduction

Haribako-e were early hand colored prints designed to be cut out and pasted as decoration onto sliding doors, folding screens, or sewing-boxes (hence the name - haribako literally means "needle-box"; sewing-boxes, generally lacquered, with many small drawers, were often part of a woman's dowry). In a similar manner, since the late 16th century it had been the fashion to paste folding fans onto doors and screens. Haribako-e were a very ephemeral fashion; they appeared in the late 1720's, and after the early 1730's they were seen no more.

The subjects were usually landscapes with small figures, but other subjects, such as Genji are also encountered; the latter continued a long tradition of decorating domestic objects with Genji-related imagery. They come in two different shapes; the so-called 'fan' shape, and 'kidney' shaped. Both formats are actually fan-shaped, in the sense that they are both representing two different uchiwa contours that were 'en vogue' in the 18th century. Most are produced using the hand-coloured urushi-e technique, although some also had areas of metallic power applied. The cloudy areas outside the main cartouche were produced using a technique known as fuki-bokashi or fuki-e.

This page attempts to catalog all known haribako-e (although it is by no means complete).
Note: If you know of any haribako-e that aren't listed here, please let me know (and scans are really appreciated, so that I don't have to track down the reference).


The Series

The following sections list all known haribako-e series.

Note: Dates are as given in the sources; most of these are likely not to be relied upon.


Artist Date Series
Shigenaga and Kiyomasu II ca. 1730-1735 'Genji Gojūyomai no Uchi (Genji in Fifty-Four Sheets)'
Kiyoharu ca. 17?? 'Eight Famous Views of Kamakura'
Kiyomasu II ca. 1730 'Mu Tamagawa Rokukei no Uchi (Six Views of the Crystal Rivers)'
Kiyomasu II ca. 1735 'Yoshiwara Hakkei, Hachi mai no Uchi (Eight Views of the Yoshiwara)'
Kiyomasu II ca. 1740 Unknown 'One Hundred Poets' series
Kiyomasu II ca. 1730 Unknown historical series
Kiyonobu II ca. 17?? 'Edo Hakkei, Hachi mai no Uchi (Eight Famous Views of Edo)'
Kiyonobu II ca. 17?? 'Shinpan Edo Hakkei (Newly Published Eight Views of Edo)'
Kiyonobu II ca. 17?? Eight Famous Views of Edo series
Masanobu ca. 1740 'Genji Gojūyon Mai no Uchi' (Genji in Fifty-Four Sheets)
Masanobu ca. 1730 'Nana Komachi uta-e Zukushi (A Collection of Poems for Seven Beauties)'
Shigenobu ca. 17?? 'Nana Komachi no uchi (Seven Stages {in the life} of Ono no Komachi)'
Toshinobu ca. 1730 'Shiki no Asobi (Pleasures of the Four Seasons)'
Unknown, style of Kiyomasu II Late 1720's - early 1730's Unknown series of eight views
Unknown, style of Kiyomasu II Early 1730's Unknown series of seven stages in the life of Ono no Komachi
Unknown, attributed to Kiyomasu II ca. 1730 Unknown series of four seasons

The Prints

The following sections list all known haribako-e, with one section for each series (they were almost all printed as part of a series). A few odd prints are included at the end.

Shigenaga and Kiyomasu II, 'Genji Gojūyomai no Uchi (Genji in Fifty-Four Sheets)'

Printed: ca. 1730-1735
Publisher: Izumyi-ya Gonshirō of Dōbō-machi

According to Waterhouse ("Images of Eighteenth Century Japan", pp. 81-82), the first 26 prints of this Genji-series were designed by Shigenaga, and the rest by Kiyomasu II.


Thumbnail Number Source
#1, "Kiritsubo (The Paulownia Court)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.19127
#2, "Hahakigi (The Broom Tree)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.19131
#3, "Utsusemi (The Shell of the Locust)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.19130
#6, "Suetsumuhana (The Safflower-Princess)" "Japanese and Chinese Prints: The Walter Amstutz Collection", Sotheby's, Tokyo, 1991; #28, pp. 64-65
#9, "Aoi (Heartvine)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.19129
#13, "Akashi" David Waterhouse, "Images of Eighteenth Century Japan", Royal Ontario Museum, 1975; #40, pp. 82-83
#13, "Akashi" Rose Hempel, "Ukiyo-e: Die Kunst der Heiteren Vergänglichen Welt, Japan 17.-19. Jahrhundert - Sammlung Scheiwe", Villa Hugel, Recklinghausen, 1972; #34, pp. 28
#14, "Miozukushi (Pilgrimage to Sumiyoshi)" David Waterhouse, "Images of Eighteenth Century Japan", Royal Ontario Museum, 1975; #41, pp. 84-85
#15, "Yomogiū (The Overgrowth of Weeds)" Art Institute of Chicago - Buckingham collection; (1927.1381)
Margaret O. Gunsaulus, "The Clarence Buckingham Collection of Japanese Prints: Volume I - The Primitives", Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, 1955; #16, pp. 191-192
Howard Link, "Ukiyo-e Prints and Paintings of the Primitive Period", AIC, 1971; #179, pp. 119
#15, "Yomogiū (The Overgrowth of Weeds)" Rose Hempel, "Ukiyo-e: Die Kunst der Heiteren Vergänglichen Welt, Japan 17.-19. Jahrhundert - Sammlung Scheiwe", Villa Hugel, Recklinghausen, 1972; #35, pp. 28
#16, "Sekiya (The Gatehouse)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.19133
#16, "Sekiya (At The Pass)" Rose Hempel, "Ukiyo-e: Die Kunst der Heiteren Vergänglichen Welt, Japan 17.-19. Jahrhundert - Sammlung Scheiwe", Villa Hugel, Recklinghausen, 1972; #36, pp. 28
#17, "E-Awase (Picture Contest)" David Waterhouse, "Images of Eighteenth Century Japan", Royal Ontario Museum, 1975; #42, pp. 86-87
#18, "Matsukaze (The Wind in the Pines)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.19132
Timothy Clark et al, "The Dawn of the Floating World 1650-1765", Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2001; #102, pp. 246-248
#19, "Usugumo (Wisps of Cloud)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.19128
#21, "Otome (The Maiden)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.19141
#22, "Tamakazura (The Jeweled Chaplet)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.19140
#27, "Kagaribi (Flares)" Museum of Fine Arts - William Sturgis Bigelow Collection; 11.13334
Timothy Clark et al, "The Dawn of the Floating World 1650-1765", Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2001; #103, pp. 246-248
#28, "Nowake (The Typhoon)" Siegfried Salzmann, Andreas Kreul, "Szenen aus dem Alten Japan: Japanische Farbholzschnitte aus eigenem Besitz", Kunsthalle, Bremen, 1993; #11, pp. 38ff
#29, "Miyuki (Imperial Progress)" David Waterhouse, "Images of Eighteenth Century Japan", Royal Ontario Museum, 1975; #9, pp. 34-35
#31, "Makibashira (Handsome Pillar)" Siegfried Salzmann, Andreas Kreul, "Szenen aus dem Alten Japan: Japanische Farbholzschnitte aus eigenem Besitz", Kunsthalle, Bremen, 1993; #12, pp. 38ff
#32, "Umegae (Plum Tree Branch)" Rose Hempel, "Gems of the Floating World: Ukiyo-e Prints from the Dresden Kupferstich-Kabinett", Japan Society, New York, 1995; #5, pp. 26-27
#34, "Wakana no Jō (Spring Shoots)" "Genshoku Ukiyo-E Daihyaaka Jiten 3", Tokyo, 1982; #229
#39, "Yūgiri (Evening Mist)" Philadelphia Museum of Art; 31-54-85
David Waterhouse, "Early Japanese Prints in the Philadelphia Museum of Art", University of Toronto, Toronto, 1983; #14, pp. 28
#39, "Yūgiri (Evening Mist)" (Note: The text says this is chapter 38, but that is incorrect; both the number and genji-mon are for 39.) Rose Hempel, "Ukiyo-e: Die Kunst der Heiteren Vergänglichen Welt, Japan 17.-19. Jahrhundert - Sammlung Scheiwe", Villa Hugel, Recklinghausen, 1972; #37, pp. 28
#47, "Agemaki (Trefoil Knots)" David Waterhouse, "Images of Eighteenth Century Japan", Royal Ontario Museum, 1975; #10, pp. 36-37

Kiyoharu, 'Eight Famous Views of Kamakura'

Publisher: Tsuru-ya Kiemon
Fan-shaped (uneven numbers) and kidney shaped (even numbers).

The UMIEC notes say that only 3 images are known from this set, and that this is the only known haribako-e series by him; the views are apparently actually of Kanazawa, not Kamakura.


Thumbnail Number Source
#4, "Evening Glow at Noshima/Nojima" (different references give different names) British Museum; 1926.5-11.010
"Ukiyo-E Masterpieces in European Collections: British Museum II", Kodansha, New York, 1988; #12
Lawrence Smith, "Ukiyoe: Images of Unknown Japan", British Museum, London, 1988; #24, pp. 49
#7, "A Fine Day at Suzaki" British Museum; 1926.5-11.011
"Ukiyo-E Masterpieces in European Collections: British Museum II", Kodansha, New York, 1988; #13

Kiyomasu II, 'Mu Tamagawa Rokukei no Uchi (Six Views of the Crystal Rivers)'

Printed: ca. 1725-1735

Thumbnail Number Source
#4, "Kii no Tamagawa Kobo Daishi (Kobo Daishi at the Tama River in Kii Province)" Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco; 1969.42.1

Kiyomasu II, 'Yoshiwara Hakkei, Hachi mai no Uchi (Eight Views of the Yoshiwara)'

Printed: ca. 1735
Publisher: Igaya, of Motohama-cho

The Amstutz collection notes indicate that another one, #7 in the series, is illustrated in GUDJH Volume III (pl. 250), but that that one is also kidney-shaped. Perhaps in this series the first four were fan-shaped, and the last kidney-shaped?


Thumbnail Number Source
#2, "Edo-cho no Yau" "Japanese and Chinese Prints: The Walter Amstutz Collection", Sotheby's, Tokyo, 1991; #8, pp. 38
#6 "Ukiyo-E Taikei I", 1974; pp. 76

Kiyomasu II, Unknown 'One Hundred Poets' series

Printed: ca. 1740

This is apparently from a series depicting the '100 Poets', although no other designs are known.


Thumbnail Number Source
#14, Kawara Sadaijin Philadelphia Museum of Art; 46-66-4
David Waterhouse, "Early Japanese Prints in the Philadelphia Museum of Art", University of Toronto, Toronto, 1983; #15, pp. 31

Kiyomasu II, Unknown historical series

Printed: ca. 1730
Publisher: Sagamiya Yohei

This is apparently from a series depicting celebrated historical incidents, although no other designs are known.


Thumbnail Number Source
#?, "Momiji-gari (The Maple-viewing Expedition)" "Japanese and Chinese Prints: The Walter Amstutz Collection", Sotheby's, Tokyo, 1991; #9, pp. 39

Kiyonobu II, 'Edo Hakkei, Hachi mai no Uchi (Eight Famous Views of Edo)'

Fan-shaped (uneven numbers) and kidney shaped (even numbers).

Thumbnail Number Source
#1, "Kannon no seiran (Clearing weather at the Kannon Temple)" Birgit Mayr, Sasaki Toshikazu, "Bestandskatalog Japanischer Kulturgüter in Deutschland: Vol. I - Collection Heidelberg", Kokusho Kankokai, Tokyo, 2003; #9.1 - #9.8, pp. 27
#2, "Ryōgoko no sekishō (Sunset glow at Ryōgoku Bridge)"
#3, "Emonzaku no yoru no ame (Night rain at Emonzaka)"
#4, "Sumidagawa no rakugan (Descending geese at the Sumida River)"
#5, "Shinagawa no kihan (Returning sails at Fukagawa)"
#6, "Ueno banshō (Evening bell at Ueno)"
#7, "Kinryūsan no bosetsu (Twilight snow at Kinryūzan Temple)"
#8, "Atago no aki no tsuki (Autumn moon at Mount Atago)"
#6, "Ueno banshō (Evening bell at Ueno)" Private collection

Kiyonobu II, 'Shinpan Edo Hakkei (Newly Published Eight Views of Edo)'

Publisher: Urokogataya Magobei This seems to be a later printing of the above series, with a recarved title cartouche.

Thumbnail Number Source
#1, "Kannon no seiran (Clearing weather at the Kannon Temple)" Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - William S. and John T. Spaulding Collection; RES.21.428 - RES.21.435
#2, "Ryōgoko no sekishō (Sunset glow at Ryōgoku Bridge)"
#3, "Emonzaku no yoru no ame (Night rain at Emonzaka)"
#4, "Sumidagawa no rakugan (Descending geese at the Sumida River)"
#5, "Shinagawa no kihan (Returning sails at Fukagawa)"
#6, "Ueno banshō (Evening bell at Ueno)"
#7, "Kinryūsan no bosetsu (Twilight snow at Kinryūzan Temple)"
#8, "Atago no aki no tsuki (Autumn moon at Mount Atago)"

Kiyonobu II, Eight Views of Edo series

This seems to be yet another printing of the above two, with a recarved title cartouche.

Thumbnail Number Source
#4, "Sumidagawa no rakugan (Descending geese at the Sumida River)" Tokyo Metropolitan Library; 048-C002

Masanobu, 'Genji Gojūyon Mai no Uchi' (Genji in Fifty-Four Sheets)

Printed: ca. 1740

Some sources report the title as being 'Genji Monogatari Etoki (The Illustrated Story of Prince Genji)'; the exact reading is uncertain.

Slightly unusual format; square paper (14 x 15.5 cm), with the main image usually in a fan-shaped cartouche, superimposed on the image of a fan with writing; some have an additional rectangular cartouche with a landscape scene as well.


Thumbnail Number Source
#1, "Kiritsubo (Paulownia Pavilion)" Klefisch, Asiatische Kunst, Auktion 83, 10 Dezember 2005; # 1A, p.15
#2, "Hahakigi (The Broom-Tree)" Musée Guimet, Paris; MA2113(01)
#13, "Akashi" Klefisch, Asiatische Kunst, Auktion 83, 10 Dezember 2005; # 1A, p.15
#14, "Miotsukushi (Pilgrimage to Sumiyoshi)" Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Gift of Dr. Lenoir C. Wright, 1996; 1996.22.1
#15, "Yomogiu (Waste of Weeds)" Klefisch, Asiatische Kunst, Auktion 83, 10 Dezember 2005; # 1A, p.15
#16, "Sekiya (The Barrier-Station)" Musée Guimet, Paris; MA2113(02)
#22, "Tamakazura (Tendril Wreath)" Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Gift of Dr. Lenoir C. Wright, 1996; 1996.22.2-1996.22.5
#26, "Tokonatsu (Pink)"
#35?, "Wakana: Ge (Spring Shoots II)"
Note: The genji-mon shown in this print quite clearly seems to be that for Chapter #1 - but the number written next to the title cartouche in kanji seems to be "35" (definitely '30-something'), and another print (see above) has been identified as Chapter #1.
#37, "Yokobue (Flute)"
#53, "Te'narai (Writing Practice)" Klefisch, Asiatische Kunst, Auktion 83, 10 Dezember 2005; # 1A, p.15
#53, "Te'narai (Writing Practice)" Lempertz Auktion #726, December/1995; #1258

Masanobu, 'Nana Komachi uta-e Zukushi (A Collection of Poems for Seven Beauties)'

Printed: ca. 1730

Fan-shaped (uneven numbers) and kidney shaped (even numbers).


Thumbnail Number Source
#3, "Nana Komachi daisanban, Kayoi Komachi" Birgit Mayr, Sasaki Toshikazu, "Bestandskatalog Japanischer Kulturgüter in Deutschland: Vol. I - Collection Heidelberg", Kokusho Kankokai, Tokyo, 2003; #17.1, #17.2, , pp. 30
#4, "Nana Komachi daiyonban, Sekidera Komachi"

Shigenobu, 'Nana Komachi no uchi (Seven Stages {in the life} of Ono no Komachi)'

Kidney shaped (even numbers); possibly fan-shaped (uneven numbers).

Thumbnail Number Source
#2 Carl Einstein, "Orbis Pictus Band 16; Der Primitive Japanische Holzschnitt", Ernst Wasmuth, Berlin, 1922; pl. 9
#6

Toshinobu, 'Shiki no Asobi (Pleasures of the Four Seasons)'

Printed: ca. 1730
Publisher: Ōmi-ya Kuhei, of Yokohama-chō Itchōme
Signature: Yamato Gwakou Okumura Toshinobu hitsu (from the 'Summer' print)

Thumbnail Number Source
"Haru (Spring), Hanami no Maku (The Flower-Viewing Curtain)" "Japanese and Chinese Prints: The Walter Amstutz Collection", Sotheby's, Tokyo, 1991; #21, pp. 55
Sale catalogue, Walter Amstutz collection, Sotheby's, 1975 (possibly erroneous date, same item?)
"Natsu (Summer)" Julius Kurth, "Die Primitiven des Japan Holzschnitt", Dresden, 1922; Pl. #30
"Aki, Dai Samban (Autumn), Kiku no Kwai (Chrysanthemum Meeting)" Art Institute of Chicago - Buckingham collection; (1927.1382)
Margaret O. Gunsaulus, "The Clarence Buckingham Collection of Japanese Prints: Volume I - The Primitives", Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, 1955; #19, pp. 181
"Fuyu (Winter)" "Genshoku Ukiyo-e Daihyakka Jiten (11 Volumes)", Tokyo, 1980-82; Volume 6, Pl. #149

Unknown (Style of Kiyomasu II)

From a series of eight views (probably). The unusual scroll-shaped cartouche is not seen in any other identified haribako-e series.

Printed: Late 1720's - early 1730's


Thumbnail Number Source
#2, "Emonzaka Yoru no Ame (Night Rain on the Emon Embankment)" Howard A. Link, "Primitive Ukiyo-e: from the James A. Michener Collection in the Honolulu Academy of Arts", 1980; Unsigned #33

Unknown (Style of Kiyomasu II)

From a series of seven stages in the life of Ono no Komachi (probably). This is stylistically very similar to the series by Shigenobu on this subject, and this print may be from that series.

Printed: Early 1730's


Thumbnail Number Source
#7, "Sotoba Komachi (Komachi Among the Tombs)" Howard A. Link, "Primitive Ukiyo-e: from the James A. Michener Collection in the Honolulu Academy of Arts", 1980; Unsigned #38

Unknown (Attributed to Kiyomasu II)

From a series of four (almost certainly).

This print clearly belongs to a series about the four seasons, but the exact title, and artist, are as yet unknown.

However, in the 1720's-30's period, it was common for the same series themes to be used in both haribako-e and vertical hosoban series, and there is a hosoban series by Kiyomasu II on the seasons, 'Shiki no Hyakushō (Four Seasons of the Farmer)', which is another possibility for the title. This latter series is especially interesting, because the Winter scene from that series, illustrated in:

 	Gunhild Avitabile, "Early Masters: Ukiyo-e Prints and Paintings
		from 1680 to 1750", Japan Society, New York, 1991; pp. 98-99
shows many very marked similarities to this print, including the title, so it's likely this that print is from a haribako-e series of the same name by Kiyomasu II.

Also, Toshinobu did a haribako-e series on this theme, 'Shiki no Asobi (Pleasures of the Four Seasons)', and so given the title, this print is surely some artist's take on that, or a similar, subject.


Thumbnail Number Source
"Fuyu (Winter), Kome Osame (Storing the Rice)" Private collection

Acknowledgements

Thanks to (in alphabetical order) Catherine Chiappa, John Fiorillo and Dick Illing, who searched for these things across catalogues of sale and show, provided scans of illustrations, translated titles, etc, etc, and especially Horst Graebner, Hans Olof Johansson and Guy Pepermans, who provided scans of a great deal of material.

Also, grateful appreciation to the Weatherspoon Art Museum at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro for allowing the use of images of prints in their collection.


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© Copyright 2007-2013 by J. Noel Chiappa

Last updated: 18/May/2013